Crunch time for PV Library film festival

Entries in PV library film festival vary

A still from “Refocus,” one of the films in the Prescott Valley Public Library’s Teen Film Festival.

Courtesy/Coleen Bornschlegel

A still from “Refocus,” one of the films in the Prescott Valley Public Library’s Teen Film Festival.

At the beginning of the summer, it felt like there was so much time until the Prescott Valley Public Library’s first-ever Teen Short Film Festival, but as June rolled into July, the film festival drew ever closer, said Teen Librarian Coleen Bornschlegel, noting that the deadline for submissions is Friday, July 14, and the festival itself is on Tuesday, July 18.

As of last week, five films had been submitted from teens in Prescott and there were a few other Prescott Valley teens still working on theirs, Bornschlegel said. As for putting the festival itself together, Bornschlegel said she’s working on the fine details and making sure everything’s in order so it runs smoothly.

“I’ve never done this before, it’ll be a trial run,” she said, commenting that the goal is to keep it simple. “I think that we’re going to have a good time.”

The films that Bornschlegel has already received are quite different in their storylines, characters and tones, making for a nice range, she said. Looking forward to seeing what else is turned in, Bornschlegel mentioned there’s another group working on an animated film.

The three top prizes for the festival are cash prizes of $50 and while it’s nothing extravagant, anyone would have fun winning $50, Bornschlegel said. There’s also three different categories of Best Picture, Best Special Effects and an Audience Choice, she said, remarking judges are lined up and are a few different people from around the community and library.

“They will be prescreening the films before the festival on Tuesday,” Bornschlegel said. “We’ll have the results after we finish showing the films that night.”

The film festival has been an opportunity for teens to try and learn something different and new, with both people who have had experience with film and others who may have had experience but are working with a new medium submitting entries, she said.

Further, it’s been cool to allow for a space for people who haven’t had an opportunity to get their work out into the world yet, Bornschlegel said, bringing up how she leads the adult coloring class and put up a display case for participants’ work.

“There’s just something about your artwork being framed and presented that really solidifies it,” she said. “I think the same thing can go for more visual projects, not just physical art, but films and music. There’s just something about being able to show what you’ve worked on and show what you’ve done.”