Editorial: Help police stop threats, before they become problem

Parents and students walk into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018, for an open house as parents and students returned to the school for the first time since 17 people were killed in a mass shooting at the school in Parkland, Fla. on Feb. 14.

David Santiago/Miami Herald via AP

Parents and students walk into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018, for an open house as parents and students returned to the school for the first time since 17 people were killed in a mass shooting at the school in Parkland, Fla. on Feb. 14.

In last week’s editorial we wrote that “it is a bad mix: when people drive a vehicle while drunk or high on drugs.” Of course. Adding to that, however, was the poignant conclusion — “If you see something, say something” — which can apply to many other scenarios as well.

Consider the incidents on the Bradshaw Mountain High School and Bradshaw Mountain Middle School campuses in the past week; seems police have had to respond four times in six days — the most recent being on Monday, Feb. 26, when they arrested a 14-year-old for “serious disruptive language.”

In the wake of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, earlier this month, admittedly tensions are high. In that tragedy, 17 people died and scores more were injured. And this trend is not limited to Humboldt schools.

On Wednesday morning, Feb. 21, police were investigating an alleged school shooting threat against Chino Valley High School that caused panic throughout that tri-city area community. The Chino Valley Police Department received a call from the high school regarding the alleged threat at about 8:50 a.m., said Vince Schaan, spokesperson for the CVPD.

The challenge is that some of the threats are, such as in the Chino Valley case, posted on social media and widely circulated. At Humboldt schools, it could have been as simple as someone overhearing tough talk.

Prescott Valley Police Chief Bryan Jarrell and Humboldt Unified School District Superintendent Dan Streeter are encouraging all parents to tell their children that threats or alleged threats are not jokes, and will not be considered as such.

Said another way: They will have zero-tolerance when it comes to these things.

“To be clear, a person does not have to carry out an act of violence, just saying it is a crime that will be pursued and prosecuted,” Jarrell stated in a news release.

The good news is all of this is avoidable; yes, there is something more we can all do. Police have repeated a slogan time and again: “See something, say something.” Thankfully several people alerted police in the Chino Valley case and many in the Prescott Valley incidents did the same.

That goes for the students as well as adults.

In the end, whether it is an impaired driver we see going down the road, someone being harmed … or merely needing some assistance, or something such as a threat we witness through social media, … make the call. Prescott Valley Police say the best solution in an emergency is to call 911. Otherwise, dial 928-772-9267.

If you see something, say something.